• Zoe Carlberg instructs AmeriCorps and Food Bank volunteers in preparing the bed for the Food Bank Garden on the SIFT farm.
  • Zoe and Camille Green harvest vegetables to sell at market.
  • Setting up for SIFT's weekly Thursday-afternoon farm stand.
  • Zoe and Tammy Howard brave an August hailstorm to sell SIFT produce.
  • SIFT's EnergyCorps volunteer Mike Daniel helps visiting kindergarteners harvest spinach.
  • On a fall visit to NCAT headquarters, Senator Jon Tester stops by the SIFT farm to chat with Camille, Zoe, Marcia Brown, and Carl Little about the project.
  • Buckwheat growing as a summer cover crop attracts many buzzing pollinators.
  • Camille explains winter bed preparation techniques during a workshop held at the SIFT demonstration farm.
  • Tammy assists customers at SIFT's first annual plant sale.
  • Row covers protect outdoor crops from October frosts.
  • Camille and volunteers stretch polyvinyl over the braces of a hoop house.
  • Before switching to the farm stand for marketing, Camille and Zoe sold SIFT's produce at the Uptown Butte farmers market.
  • Zoe adds expired vegetables from Albertsons to trenches dug in the soil for over-winter trench composting.
  • Mike with the cold frame he and SIFT intern Nathaniel Mack built.
  • Nathaniel tilling in the cover crop of buckwheat to add organic matter to the soil.
  • Volunteer Kaleena Miller and Zoe finish mulching garlic during a blustery early October snowstorm.

Welcome

SIFT (Small-Scale Intensive Farm Training program) was created to help every community increase their food security by producing their own healthy food. SIFT, with NCAT, is developing a working, sustainably managed, demonstration farm on five acres at our Butte, Montana, headquarters. This farm serves as the backdrop for an intensive, hands-on training program that teaches farmers and future farmers, urban food producers, community leaders, and citizens how to commercially produce high-value, nutrient-rich food on small parcels of land.

More About Our Project More About Small Scale Agriculture

 

SIFT's Demonstration Farm: Click map to explore!


Outside Temp: 30.2 F

Last Updated: 2014-12-22 17:38:40 MST

Plot 1

20' x 40'. Originally tilled up in 2011 and amended with compost and manure, we currently have four wide beds in this plot.

Currently growing: Jersey Supreme and Mary Washington asparagus varieties, three varieties of broccoli (De Cicco, Calabrese, and Umpqua), lettuce mix, and scallions. Drip irrigated.

Plot 2

20' x 40'. Originally tilled up in 2011, and amended with compost and manure.

Currently growing: A mixed cover crop of oats, peas, millet, radish, and rye, to improve the soil after two seasons of crops.

Plot 3

20' x 40'. Tilled up in 2013, and amended with manure.

Currently growing: Three varieties of peas (Oregon Giant Snow, Sugar Snap, and Cascadia Snap), three varieties of carrots (Nelson, Parisienne, and Purple Haze), and spinach.

Plot 4

20' x 40'. Tilled up in 2013, amended with manure.

Currently growing: Three varieties of hardneck garlic (Music, German Red, and Russian Red), three varieties of potatoes (Sangre, Yukon Gold, and Russet), and onions.

Plot 5

20' x 40'. Tilled up in 2013, amended with manure.

Currently growing: a variety of winter and summer squashes, basil, corn, and several varieties of beans.

The Garage

The garage houses NCAT's company Priuses, but SIFT also uses it for storage purposes. Most of our tools and hoses hang in here, as well as many of our seeds. Under the overhang on the north side of the garage where we hang our garlic to cure, we have a wash station for produce processing.

Hoophouse 1

Latest Temperature: 42.08 F

Last Updated: 2014-12-22 17:39:33 MST

12' x 40'. Built in 2011 using untreated 2"x8" hemfir boards for the baseboards, rebar, 2" PVC pipes for the hoops, 1" PVC pipes for purlins, untreated 1x4" hemfir boards for hipboards, plywood for the north end, and 6-mil greenhouse film from Farmtek as a cover. A 30% reflective shadecloth covers the top of the hoop house to block some of the hot sun, and the sides can roll up to the hipboards, approximately 4' above the baseboards, to provide air circulation in summer. Soil amended with manure. Total cost: about $1,500.

Currently growing: About 14 varieties of tomatoes.

Hoophouse 2

Latest Temperature: 28.58 F

Last Updated: 2014-12-22 17:38:48 MST

12' x 40'. Built in 2011 using untreated 2"x8" hemfir boards for the baseboards, rebar, 2" PVC pipes for the hoops, 1" PVC pipes for purlins, untreated 1"x4" hemfir boards for hipboards, plywood for the ends, and 5-mm Solexx as a cover. Total cost: about $1,800.

Currently growing: Annapolis and Cavendish strawberries.

Hoophouse 3

Latest Temperature: 7.7 F

Last Updated: 2014-12-18 00:09:13 MST

12' x 40'. Built in 2011 using untreated 2"x8" hemfir boards for the baseboards, rebar, 2" PVC pipes for the hoops, 1" pvc pipes for purlins, untreated 1"x4" hemfir boards for hipboards, and 6- mil greenhouse film from FarmTek as a cover. The sides of the hoop house can roll up to the hipboards, approximately 2' above the baseboards, to provide air circulation in summer. Total cost: about $1,500.

Currently growing: A mixed cover crop of oats, peas, millet, radish, and rye, to improve the soil after two seasons of crops. They're now so tall that we have to put our sprinkler on top of a five-gallon bucket to water in here.

Hoophouse 4

Latest Temperature: 35.78 F

Last Updated: 2014-12-01 12:59:42 MST

12' x 40'. Built in 2011 using untreated 2x8" hemfir boards for the baseboards, rebar, 2" pvc pipes for the hoops, 1" pvc pipes for purlins, untreated 1x4" hemfir boards for hipboards, plywood for the north end, and 6-mil greenhouse film from Farmtek as a cover. A 30% bulk shadecloth covers the top of the hoop house to block some of the sun, and the sides of the hoop house can roll up to the hipboards, approximately 2' above the baseboards, to provide air circulation in summer. Soil amended with manure. Total cost: about $1,500.

Currently growing: Cucumbers, melons, and winter squash.

The Greenhouse


Latest Temperature: 28.94 F

Last Updated: 2014-12-22 17:39:54 MST

 


In addition to the greenhouse attached to the south side of the NCAT building (not pictured on this map), the SIFT farm includes this freestanding greenhouse. Built in 1978 as a demonstration of a low-cost passive solar greenhouse (meaning we add no additional heat), and facing due south to capture the maximum amount of sunlight, NCAT employees used it for years to grow vegetables in the raised beds. SIFT took over management of the greenhouse in 2011.

Currently growing in the freestanding greenhouse: No crops in the greenhouse-- we're in the process of improving the configuration of the beds. However, our 20 newly-arrived chicks are cheeping away in here! The raised beds in front contain chives, mint, dill, thyme, oregano, garden sage, and nemorosa sage.

Currently growing in the attached greenhouse: Sweet peppers, chile peppers, mint, sage, parsley, basil, and cilantro.

Compost Piles

Constructed in 2012 from old shipping pallets and revamped in 2013, the majority of SIFT's composting happens in these four large bins. With donations from local grocery stores, cafes, and community members, as well as scraps from around the farm, we build our own valuable soil amendment. Compost is great for adding nutrients to the soil, as well as binding together soil particles to improve soil structure and better retain water and nutrients—an essential when your soil is as sandy as ours.

How-To

Composting is essentially just speeding up the natural process of decomposition and using it to your advantage. It will work whether you have a fancy bin or a hole in the ground, whether you turn and aerate it regularly or leave it alone. But the fastest way to make great compost is to alternate layers of a few inches of "brown," high-carbon materials (like dried leaves, straw, strips of newspaper, coffee filters) with a few inches of "green," high-nitrogen materials (like fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds, tea bags, eggshells, garden scraps). Keep the pile moist and make sure air is getting inside by turning the pile with a shovel or pitchfork once every week or two. If it's getting aerated, the microbes in the pile doing all the decomposing should heat things up to about 140 degrees F; regular turning maintains this temperature. Once the pile has cooled down, if none of the inputs are recognizable and the compost smells like good soil, it's ready to use. If turning the pile isn't an option, it will just take a few more months to decompose. To learn more, check out Camille's Compost Tutorial, and the ATTRA publication, Composting: The Basics.

The Food Bank Garden

With the help of numerous volunteers from the food bank, AmeriCorps, NCAT, and Butte's Chief Executive, the food bank garden has broken ground! The Butte Emergency Food Bank has no space for a garden on their site, so we've located it at the SIFT farm. It provides fresh, local produce for the food bank, which primarily gets donations of canned or processed foods. If you're interested in volunteering at the food bank garden and helping them grow fresh, tasty, nutrient-packed produce for those in need, email us!

Kids Garden

We love having kids come to the SIFT farm. It's rare to see a child as excited about eating a vegetable as when they've just pulled it out of the ground-- seeing and understanding where food comes from is one of the most important parts of developing healthy eating habits. That, and digging in the dirt is just a lot of fun.

We enlisted the help of some local kindergarteners in preparing the designated kids garden, where school classes, summer camps, and other groups can come to participate in some small-scale farming. If you're interested in bringing a group over, shoot us an email via the contact form at the top of the page.

Native Hedgerow

The native hedgerow is composed of a variety of shrubs and grasses native to Montana in a two-row border around the SIFT farm. The outer row includes the saskatoon/service berry and chokecherry, which grow to about 12-14 feet and produce edible berries, and the inner row includes golden currant, which also produces edible berries, woods rose, and silverberry, which grow to about 6-8 feet. A third row of basin wildrye grass completes the hedgerow.

Native plants need little care and watering once established since they're adapted to the local climate, and their presence will both protect crops from strong winds and increase biodiversity-- important in strengthening the health of the farm by attracting beneficial species that help pollinate and control pests. The flowers of native plants attract significantly more local insects than the flowers of non-natives, so with this hedgerow we can attract many more pollinators to the farm. Before planting the hedgerow, there was just one shrub and one tree on the entire property, so the hedgerow will be a huge improvement to our farm's biodiversity.

 

 

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